Posts Tagged ‘Sport’

It is no surprise to me that Bet365 and no doubt many other sports bet agencies are doing everything they can to maximize their profits at the expense of a fair playing field.  A Bet365 insider has come forward and explained how they limit how much winning punters can win, as Bet365 is only interested in encouraging losing gamblers to lose more.

So if you think sports betting is a level playing field, compared to say the pokies where we know they are programmed in how much they payout, think again.  You are gambling against sophisticated algorithms that are designed to limit how much you can win and maximize how much you lose.

Beaner

 

In this sports betting company, the winners are called ‘problem customers’

On a hot Saturday afternoon in Darwin, James Poppleton is mopping the sweat from his brow.

It hasn’t rained for 160 days.

On this particular day, he’s got even more reason to perspire.

He’s about to speak out against his former employer — one of the world’s largest betting companies.

Mr Poppleton worked for 18 months as a customer account supervisor at bet365.

What he saw during his time at the company disturbed him so much he’s blowing the whistle on bet365’s practices — despite the personal risk.

The problem with winning

“Australians have an innate sense of fairness almost built-in, and what the bookies do, what bet365 does is not fair,” he said.

“You can’t win. Those that win are stopped. Those that lose are exploited and then they develop cheating techniques as well.”

Taking in a game of women’s AFL at Tracy Village Oval, there’s a palpable sense that a deluge of rain is about to break Darwin’s dry spell, and James is spilling what he knows about how parts of the sports betting industry operates.

“I’m speaking out about bet365 because the information I know is a burden on my conscience.”

For the first time, he’s revealing how bet365 uses backdoor algorithms, restrictions and alleged delaying tactics to skew the competition and drive up profits — all while the punter thinks they’re playing a fair game.

Punters are suspicious

It was a bet365 promotion on the Big Bash League that made the agency attractive to Daniel Laidlaw. He’s a punter who understands odds better than most.

A professional poker player by night, he treats sports betting as a hobby.

He noticed something unusual was happening with his bet365 account earlier this year.

“When I tried to place my usual-sized bets, it was apparent that I could only bet to win an amount in the range of $5-10 dollars when previously, I’d be able to bet to win amounts between $1,000 and $5,000.”

As a result, Mr Laidlaw now gambles with offshore betting sites that pay no tax in Australia.

Bet365 won’t tell Mr Laidlaw why it restricted the size of his bets.

ABC Investigations has obtained a screenshot of Mr Laidlaw’s account details from inside bet365. It reveals that he has been effectively banned from betting with the agency. The truth is revealed by a secret algorithm that classifies Daniel as a successful punter and therefore a risk to the company’s profits.

Daniel's risk rating is shown as 0.0025

It rates him at 0.0025. This means inside bet365 Mr Laidlaw is considered a threat to its bottom-line.

According to former bet365 employee James Poppleton, a risk rating of 0.0025 is one of the highest that can be assigned.

He explains how the system operates:

“Your data tells them how many bets you’ve placed, what sport you’ve put it on, your average bet, your total turnover and your win or loss ratio to the company,” he says.

“If you win, the algorithm kicks in and stops you from being able to bet any significant amount of money.”

Mr Laidlaw has not been able to obtain his risk rating from the company itself.

“I think it’s outrageous. It’s unfair. And there’s also just no transparency. If they’re profiling us in this way, then we should know as customers exactly what it means and have access to this information,” he says.

No one from bet365 would agree to an interview with the ABC. In a statement, it said its “service is provided in accordance with its published terms and conditions and all applicable laws and regulations.”

As part of those terms and conditions, it can close or suspend an account at any time for any reason.

Mr Poppleton claims these algorithms apply not just to winners, but those who lose as well.

“As soon as you start losing, they’ll open you up to lose more and more and more, you can bet bigger and bigger amounts,” he says.

“If you stop winning, you’re allowed to bet more and more and more. It’s the opposite of responsible gambling.”

Bet365 said it, “has a robust responsible gambling policy in place to monitor each customer’s gambling patterns and expenditure and ensure that their gambling behaviour is within responsible limits.”

A reclusive billionaire

From humble origins, bet365 has capitalised on an explosion in online gambling and now boasts over $5 billion in turnover for its global operations. The UK-based agency is privately owned by the Coates family and based in the city of Stoke-on-Trent.

At its centre is the reclusive mathematical and entrepreneurial genius Denise Coates, who is now by far Britain’s highest-paid chief executive officer; she took home a whopping $506 million pay packet last year.

Her father owned what she once described as a “small chain of pretty rubbish betting shops”. It has been reported she bought the domain name bet365.com on eBay and launched the business from a portable cabin in a car park near one of the family betting shops.

‘Ban or bankrupt’

Bet365 soon pioneered a new way of maximising profits.

The betting agency would entice punters to sign up with good odds, free bets and special offers and then ban or restrict the successful ones, sending them off to gamble with their competitors.

“The other companies didn’t know what to do,” says Brian Chappell, the founder of the UK consumer advocate group Justice for Punters.

“They were asking: ‘How do we get our losing customers back because all we’re ending up with is our winning customers?’ So, they had to join the game, didn’t they?”

The consumer advocate describes the business model that bet365 pioneered as “ban or bankrupt”.

“It’s this business model of being really, really ruthless with your customer base. You end up with a customer base that is virtually 100 per cent known losers.”

Part of bet365’s success in Australia is attributable to its relationship with the biggest sporting codes — it’s an official gold partner of Cricket Australia.

Its logo can be seen on the boundary rope during play, and the odds are regularly spruiked during pay-TV coverage.

‘Problem customers’

For bet365 the most lucrative area of sports betting globally is in-play betting, although the company claims it’s a minor part of its Australian business. In-play allows punters to bet while a match is live — the next goal in football, the next try in football, the next wicket in cricket.

Bullet points describing the problem customer.

A smart in-play punter will have a good knowledge of the sport, an understanding of how odds work and will then apply those skills to try and beat the bookmaker in fast-moving sports where odds can sometimes lag behind what’s unfolding in the game.

In Australia, you can only bet in-play over the phone thanks to laws dating back to 2001 which attempted to minimise the losses from online betting.

A secret internal bet365 document obtained by ABC Investigations suggests that mandatory phone betting for in-play was causing problems for the company.

The policy document, dated September 2016, is designed to deal with what bet365 calls “problem customers” and says:

“The nature of betting on the telephone as opposed to betting online lends itself to the possibility of being exploited in fast-changing markets … some customers are aware of this fact and use the pace of the sport to their advantage when placing bets.”

The leaked document shows that bet365 was concerned by customers stalling on the phone or placing what it calls late bets.

bet365 told the ABC it targets, “those who seek to gain an unfair advantage over other customers through deliberately deceptive and fraudulent means including by using delay tactics and other abuses of the system.”

Given the terms and conditions already allows the company to ban customers it suspects of fraud or reject any bet it sees fit, James Poppleton describes the problem customer policy in a different way.

“We were having lots of customers who were better than the trading department at betting at live in-play, so they would see where the odds were just that little bit better than what they believed they should be. And they were winning,” he says.

The so-called “problem customers” were put on a list and managed by a special team which would check their betting history, listen to their calls and potentially restrict them from betting.

According to Mr Poppleton, this policy wasn’t doing enough to prevent these “problem customers” from winning.

He claims the company came up with a new secret strategy to deal with them.

‘Delay testing’

An internal bet365 email from September 2017, obtained by ABC Investigations, announced that something called Quick Code Delay Testing was taking place.

Customers making Quick Code bets over the phone using 3- or 4-digit codes were having the length of their calls logged. According to the email, the testing was to see, “if there is any delay between placing the bets on Cricket as opposed to the other sports.”

Lawyers acting for the company told the ABC that the purpose of the testing was designed to reduce “naturally occurring” delays experienced by customers when placing bets over the phone.

Mr Poppleton had suspicions it was for something else entirely.

He claims the testing was to see whether customers would notice if there was a delay for in-play betting on certain sports.

“I asked one of the managers if the purpose of the testing was to see whether or not you could tell if there was a delay at the point of bet placement within the tele-bet software. And he said, yes.”

The ABC contacted the manager in question and asked him to confirm Mr Poppleton’s allegation. He did not respond.

Mr Poppleton claims at the time, there was a delay of 1-3 seconds between when a bet was submitted over the phone in certain sports and when it was accepted.

Seconds may not sound like much, but when betting on fast-moving sports involving elite athletes, even micro-seconds can count. Broadcast delays can mean the action on the TV is a few seconds behind the action at the ground.

He claims any delay would give more time for a bookmaker to reject a punter’s bet or reconsider the odds on offer.

The former bet365 employee says the testing stopped soon after he raised the issue with a manager.

Mr Poppleton concluded that it had solved the problem of sharp punters winning on in-play and it was no longer necessary to use the “problem customer” policy.

“The procedures we used to manage customers who were beating us in-play were no longer needed.”

He claims the alleged delay was big enough to make a difference but small enough for the punter not to notice and gave bet365 an unfair advantage.

Bet365 told the ABC, “it has never used any form of delay in its telephone in-play betting service in Australia,” and that its “telephone system does not have any such functionality”.

Delay ‘is cheating’: Punter

ABC Investigations has obtained four screenshots from computer terminals inside bet365. They show customer accounts which have the words “Delay Added” next to punters’ names.

Three of these accounts appear to belong to overseas punters.

“I’ve seen a complaint spreadsheet that a couple of international customers had asked if there was a delay within their accounts,” says James Poppleton.

He says if there’s a delay put on for overseas customers it’s unfair, especially if they’re not told about it:

“Putting a delay into people’s accounts or into individual sports and not informing the punter is cheating. They are only doing it to make more profit, to stop people who are smarter than the bookie and to win more money off them, to cheat them. Punters should know what the rules of betting are.”

One of the accounts with “Delay Added” next to the punter’s name appears to be Australian but also has the term “Aus BetCall” against it. This is a reference to an old bet365 system which allowed a punter to place bets using a phone or computer without having to have an actual human conversation.

Screenshot says "Picking off slow suspends (Aus BetCall) - delay added"

Several betting agencies had different versions of these systems but they are no longer in use after a government crackdown.

The regulator

The main regulator for sports betting is the Northern Territory Racing Commission.

The NT government introduced very low tax rates to attract corporate bookmakers ten years ago. More than 20 agencies subsequently set up their headquarters in Darwin, including bet365.

Alastair Shields has been the chair of the NT Racing Commission for just over 18 months.

He says he’s not heard of any allegations about delays in in-play betting.

“If there was some deliberate action taken to delay … that’s something we would have jurisdiction to look at, in particular, whether that, I guess, complies with their licence conditions, within the terms and conditions of their contract.”

When it comes to restrictions placed on successful punter’s accounts he says he has had complaints about that, but there’s little he could do about it.

“Essentially, it’s a contractual matter between a client and a sports bookmaker. That’s a bit the same as if I go into a shop and the shopkeeper decides they don’t want to serve me. They can decide not to do that.”

A fair bet?

Mr Poppleton had an acrimonious relationship with bet365 before he left and is worried about the cost of speaking out.

“They’ll either deny it and say I’m lying or that I’m a disgruntled employee.”

He says two disputes with management before he left the company were resolved but he began to question the culture of bet365.

Mr Poppleton says one was over staff being forced to take annual leave and another about employees being disciplined for taking sick leave.

“It motivated me to look further into the other activities of the company, and that led me to discover that the whole company is set up for screwing the punter.”

He says he’s ashamed about his time working for bet365 but hopes speaking out will help shed light on the secretive world of sports betting.

“I think punters, when they find out, will be angry. Aussie punters think they’re getting a fair go. Getting a fair game. A fair bet. And they’re not.”

By Steve Cannane and Kyle Taylor

Fri 6 Dec 2019, 11:52 AM AEDT

https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-05/bet365-whistleblower-says-winners-given-delays/11768486

 

AFL clubs reaped millions of dollars from poker machines last year, as pokies losses in Victorian pubs and clubs swelled to $2.7 billion – the second highest amount on record.

Just let that figure sink in for a minute – $2.7 billion in just Victoria, which equates to $7.397 million a day being lost on poker machines across the state.  That is a staggering amount of money!

Beaner

 

AFL clubs fill boots with pokies cash, as losses hit $2.7bn

Losses hit the highest level in ten years, data from the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulator released Friday shows, and the state’s poorest suburbs were over-represented.

The City of Brimbank – which covers St Albans, Sunshine and surrounding areas – topped the list at $143 million as the local government area with the greatest losses..

The $2.69 billion lost in the 2018/19 financial year is the second highest on record, after 2009. However it is only slightly (0.13 per cent) higher than last year, even with population growth and inflation.

The figures do not include more than 2500 machines inside Melbourne’s Crown Casino.

The data shows more than $77 million was lost in machines owned by Victorian AFL clubs during the year. Hawthorn had the greatest share making just under $24.7 million from its 165 machines at the West Waters Hotel in Caroline Springs and Vegas At Waverley Gardens, in Mulgrave.

Losses at those venues were $400,000 higher than last year.

Hawthorn, along with Carlton (which took $17.8 million at its venues), Essendon ($11.1 million), Richmond ($5.3 million) and St Kilda ($2.3 million) were all recently handed new 20-year licences to operate the machines out to 2042.

But they are coming under pressure on the controversial money makers, with all other Victorian clubs either exiting their poker machines or pledging to do so.

Anti-gambling campaigner Tim Costello said poker machines lead to the loss of “much more than money”.

How can the AFL possibly promote good mental health and family values when it is profiting from gambling harm?

“In extreme cases, poker machines cause the loss of lives due to suicide,” said Rev Costello, from the Alliance for Gambling Reform.

“How can the AFL possibly promote good mental health and family values when it is profiting from gambling harm?”

AFL commission chairman Richard Goyder has previously said he wants clubs to reduce their dependence on the gambling revenue.

Collingwood got out this year selling its pokies venues – The Club in Melton and the Coach and Horses in Maroondah – late in calendar 2018. Those two venues took $12.9 million in losses across the full 2019 financial year.

Geelong, Melbourne and the Western Bulldogs have all pledged to get out of pokies, while North Melbourne has been pokies-free for a decade.

The Bulldogs took $5.8 million from Club Leeds in Footscray and the Peninsula Club in Dromana, while Geelong took $7 million from its Brook on Sneydes hotel in Point Cook, which it hopes to sell this year.

Melbourne sold its Leighoak Club early in the year, and made $2.8 million from its remaining venue, the Bentleigh Club in Glen Eira. The club will not renew it license on that club’s machines when it expires in 2022.

A spokesman for Victorian Gaming Minister Marlene Kairouz said the goverment was tackling problem gambling by freezing the number of pokies across the state until 2042, capping the number of pokies in vulnerable areas and limiting EFTPOS withdrawals in venues.

The Epping Plaza Hotel was the venue in Victoria with the highest losses at $20.2 million, followed by Berwick Springs Hotel ($19.6 million), the Plough Hotel in Mill Park ($19.6 million), Kealba Hotel in Sunshine ($19.2 million), and Skyways Taverner in Airport West ($18.6 million).

The Casey, Greater Geelong , Greater Dandenong, Hume, Monash and Wyndham council areas all recorded losses of over $100 million, the VCGLR data shows.

The AFL clubs and the league were contacted for comment.

The Age – Patrick Hatch – July 26, 2019

So when the president of the Hawthorn football club and Beyond Blue talks about the dangers of sportsbetting, we should take it seriously.  Nevermind his club collects the most money from poker machines of any AFL team, where poker machines have caused gambling addiction and wrecked lives ever since they were introduced into Victoria… by Kennett.

Beaner

 

‘Biggest scourge’: Kennett takes aim at AFL’s betting stance

Hawthorn president Jeff Kennett has lashed the AFL over its stance on sports betting, which he described as the “biggest scourge in our community”.

The former Victorian premier believes issues associated with gambling have overtaken mental health as the biggest challenge in the game, while his Greater Western Sydney counterpart Tony Shepherd has called for more regulation.

Kennett, whose club collects more money from poker machines than any other in the league, is concerned about the volume of betting advertising during broadcasts of games.

The AFL has an estimated $10 million deal with corporate sports bookmaker Crownbet, which runs live odds on the league’s website during games, while broadcasters Channel Seven and Fox Footy have their own betting partners.

Kennett described betting on sport and horseracing as a “very serious gambling threat”.

“I hold the AFL not responsible, partly responsible, I think sports betting is the biggest scourge in our community at the moment,” Kennett said at a business lunch in Melbourne run by club sponsor Bingo.

“It’s not restricted in terms of its promotion and advertising in the same way casinos or gaming machines are.

“So you’re now not only getting players but you’re getting children who are being indoctrinated from an early age to believe their future or future success and future wealth will come from gaming. The AFL is a major beneficiary from the money paid from sports betting.”

The federal government’s ban on gambling advertising during all live sports broadcasts between 5am and 8.30pm came into effect in March. The move is designed to reduce children’s exposure.

Kennett believes the widespread access to bookmakers on mobile phones is contributing to the problem.

“They train for a couple of hours, have an hour down, not long enough to leave the environment where they’re at, so they get on the new devices and that has caused a lot of trouble to a lot of players,” Kennett said.

“So they finish their career without anything at all in terms of cash. We’re very aware of that at Hawthorn … but it’s very hard to educate and encourage young men who are earning a lot of money what they can do in the privacy of their own time.”

Former players Brendan Fevola, Brent Guerra and Daniel Ward are among those who have spoken publicly about their gambling addictions.

Shepherd described betting as a “disease” in the sporting codes.

“This gambling issue could impact the integrity of the game in future. I see it as a significant issue that has to be dealt with,” Shepherd, a former president of the Business Council of Australia, said.

“I’m an anti-regulation person but I think regulation is probably the only answer.”

The AFL defended its betting partnerships, saying they helped the league in their integrity measures by giving them access to betting records of participants.

“The reason we have our agreements with various wagering partners is so the AFL can monitor all betting transactions in Australia, including whether players or officials are betting for integrity purposes,” an AFL spokesman said.

By Andrew Wu

2 August 2018 — 8:56pm

 

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/afl/biggest-scourge-kennett-takes-aim-at-afl-s-betting-stance-20180802-p4zv5s.html

If you watch any free to air TV you are likely to have seen a Sportsbet Ad – “Hey fellas!”  These are on regularly over the weekend and during footy games that are broadcast by Ch 7.  If you listen to SEN1116, every morning they cross to someone from Sportsbet, or whoever is paying them for time to get an update on the odds for the next round.  This has become so normalised that betting and the AFL have become synonymous with each other.  The AFL lists Crownbet as one of their Official partners (while ironically also having Carlton Draft and Drinkwise as partners), so when you look at the upcoming games on their website, Crownbet have the odds ready for you, and if you click on one of the odds by mistake, you get taken straight to a betslip on the Crownbet page.  I wonder how many kids have done that, wishing they had $10 to bet on their favourite team….

Beaner

 

Sport and betting don’t have to go together, but kids don’t know that

By Louise Glanville

22nd July 2018

By the time they are teens, and certainly before they reach adulthood, kids in Victoria are being influenced by an industry with deep pockets.

Awkward conversations with tweens about everything from smoking and alcohol to sex and drugs have become a fact of life. Uncomfortable? Maybe. Necessary? Without a doubt.

And so it is these days with yet another, perhaps less obvious, public health issue; gambling.

Remember when you could watch sport without seeing a gambling ad? The thing is, kids don’t.

Bombarded by an excess of ads, invitations, promotions and inducements delivered via smartphone, TV, computer, billboards and at matches, a large majority — 75 per cent — of kids aged 8–16 years believe that betting on sport is normal.

By 18, many have started betting themselves, unaware or ill-equipped to manage the associated risks and potential harms, which range in manifestation and severity but typically involve one or a combination of financial hardship, emotional distress, family conflict and difficulty with work or study.

Sport-related gambling turnover soaring

The turnover from sport-related gambling in Victoria has increased significantly over the past decade and is putting young men, especially, at greater risk of gambling harm.

This is borne out by newly released research led by Dr Rebecca Jenkinson of the Australian Institute of Family Studies, Weighing up the odds: Young men, sports and betting, which looked at the motivations, attitudes and behaviours of 18–35-year-old men exposed to gambling advertising.

An alarming, but not surprisingly high proportion (70 per cent) of the 335 bettors in the quantitative study of more than 400 young men were found to be at risk of, or already experiencing, gambling harm. Of these, 15 per cent were considered to be over the threshold for “problem gambling” as measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index, a tool for estimating a person’s risk of gambling problems and, consequently, harm.

Eighty-one per cent reported having used at least one form of betting promotion in the previous 12 months, such as sign-up bonuses (58 per cent) and multi-bets (49 per cent). And two-thirds (64 per cent) said they had bet on sports while affected by alcohol, half of whom spent more money or placed more bets than they would have had they not been drinking.

Bettors who gambled weekly were significantly more likely to spend more on bets across more sports, use multiple online betting accounts, be motivated by boredom and chase losses — all warning signs of harm.

So what does this tell us?

Kids targeted by gambling industry with deep pockets

By the time they are teens, and certainly before they reach adulthood, kids are being influenced by an industry with deep pockets that, according to the Standard Media Index, spent $234.5 million on gambling advertising in Australia in 2016, up from $89.7 million in 2011, excluding sponsorships and in-program content. It’s no wonder young adults are engaging in risky gambling and experiencing harm.

While both state and Commonwealth governments have recently taken action to address where and when the gambling industry can promote its products, the community too has a responsibility to ensure that young people have the knowledge and tools they need to think critically, and make informed choices, about gambling.

As part of her research, Dr Jenkinson also conducted interviews with a small sample of CEOs and regional general managers of Victorian sporting clubs and leagues, parents and bettors.

The majority felt there was a need for greater regulation of sports betting advertising, and most noted that sports betting was too easily accessible, especially for those who might be experiencing harm.

Clubs must help members make informed gambling choices

Interestingly, all of the sports administrators interviewed believed that sporting leagues and clubs should play a role in supporting members to make informed choices about gambling.

The Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation is partnering, through our Love the Game program, with elite soccer, rugby union, cricket and all 10 Victorian AFL clubs, as well as 300 community sporting clubs, to counter the normalisation of gambling in sport.

The decision by these clubs to reduce the exposure of fans and players to sports betting advertising, and thereby challenge the assumption that sport and betting go hand-in-hand, demonstrates the importance they place on this issue. I applaud their commitment.

This weekend’s dedicated AFL Victoria Love the Game Round provides an opportunity for all Victorians — fans and players alike — to share and celebrate as a community all the things we enjoy about footy, which have nothing to do with gambling.

And it offers an ideal opening for parents, teachers, coaches and other influential adults to talk to the kids in their care about gambling risks and harms so that they can develop a balanced, realistic understanding of how gambling works.

You and I know that sport and betting don’t have to go together. It’s time to let kids know that, too.

Love the game, not the odds.

Louise Glanville is CEO of the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-22/sports-gambling-afl-sporting-clubs-favour-kids-over-betting/10011962?section=sport

Australia has the highest rates of problem gambling in world, and the normalising of it through advertising and imbedded dialogue during live sport is going to affect generations to come.  Is it possible anymore to watch a game of AFL without a refence to the odds and the sportsbet favourite, from the commentators to the ads to the cuts to Sportsbet?

Beaner

 

Online, interactive sports gambling addiction takes heavy toll on young men, says Tim Costello

While poker machines have been a perennial concern for problem gambling among older Australians, there is a slick and deceptive juggernaut quickly taking hold of young men — sports gambling.

According to Alliance for Gambling Reform spokesperson Tim Costello, the nature of watching live sport as a young man in Australia has changed dramatically.

Men are no longer taking an interest in just whether their team wins, they are financially invested in games they might have never watched because they have a wager on the outcome.

“Sports betting is the fastest growing level of addiction,” Mr Costello said.

“Pokies target middle-aged women who are invited to go to a club, dress up and someone opens the door for you and you sit there and devastate your life.

“Sports betting targets young men and that’s a rapidly growing area of addiction.”

Mr Costello’s thoughts have been echoed by an Australian Gambling Research Centre report into interactive gambling, which states that sports and race wagering are the dominant forms of interactive gambling in Australia, and interactive gamblers are more likely to be young men.

It is one of the key issues that will be discussed today at the University of Wollongong’s Innovation Campus for The Spectrum of Gambling Harms Seminar.

Governments to blame for sports betting rise: Costello

Mr Costello said Australia had the highest rates of problem gambling in world, as well as being home to 20 per cent of the world’s poker machines.

He rejected the concept that betting was part of the Australian character, and has levelled the blame for the prevalence of gambling in Australia at state governments.

“The immoral failure of state governments to protect the vulnerable and instead allow more pokies is one of the big reasons [for problem gambling in Australia],” he said.

“Incessant sports betting and the lax rules that allow kids to be targeted with what are gambling products when the footy and cricket are on — that’s another one of the reasons.”

But Clubs NSW spokesperson Anthony Ball said the majority of people who played poker machines did it safely and within their budget.

”There’s a small fraction of the population that doesn’t and we’ve been committed to looking for ways to help people who do have a problem to help themselves,” he said.

“Australians are punters and it’s part of our history and culture and there’s no doubt pokies are a popular form of recreation for the working-class man.”

He said problem gambling rates in NSW had been falling and were below one per cent of the adult population.

“Clubs for a decade have been heavily invested in providing education for their staff and becoming better at identifying problematic behaviour.

“There is an abundance of information and people to talk to, and we want them to understand how poker machines work and allow people to exclude themselves using a web-based interface — every club with gambling does that and they care about their members.”

How interactive gambling can take hold

While a poker-machine player has the gatekeeper of a club employee, when it comes to interactive gambling it is done in private and on phones and home computers.

A problem gambler can place bets quietly and repeatedly without anyone seeing them to identify that there is something wrong.

ABC RN contributor Leigh shared his story of gambling addiction that eventually saw him convicted for fraud after stealing $130,000 from his employer to fuel his addiction.

“The bets would range anywhere between $5,000 and $20,000 a day. I would bet until 3:00am, try to sleep for three hours and bet again for another three hours on online racing in the United States,” he said.

“I always thought the stereotypical gambling addict was a working-class, middle-aged man or woman, sitting at their local club, feeding their favourite pokies machine four or five nights a week, but I rarely ventured into the local TAB.”

Mr Costello said each problem gambler in Australia will lose about $1,100 dollars per year, which is the highest in the world.

Singapore is next highest for losses ($800), then Ireland ($600).

“Having done this for 20 years, you start to think ‘maybe it’s time to give up’, but the encouraging thing is that we now are seeing such disgust from the public at sports betting,” Mr Costello said.

“We’re going to get a ban on sports betting ads before 8:30 at night, and that’s pressure the Federal Government has been brought under, so that’s a win.”

 

By Justin Huntsdale

Posted 6 Sep 2017

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-06/sports-gambling-taking-hold-of-young-men/8877420

In a move that probably doesn’t go far enough, the federal government has instigated a policy so that no gambling ads will be allowed before 8:30pm on Australian TV.  I personally feel gambling advertising is a blight on the enjoyment of sport, especially when commercial TV and radio sell out to the sports betting agencies, as the AFL has done, to line their pockets at the expense of problem gamblers.  Listening to 3MMM makes me feel ill with their sponsors seemingly more important than the games they are supposed to be covering.  Maybe one day our kids will be able to just enjoy being sports fans without constantly being bombarded with odds and deals and specials as well.

Beaner

 

Gambling advertising to be banned during live sporting events

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has confirmed the Government will ban gambling advertising before 8.30pm during live sporting events, and for five minutes before and after the start of play.

ABC News revealed last month that the plan had been taken to Cabinet.

It faced a backlash from the executives of some of the nation’s biggest sporting codes, who argued restricting gambling advertising would slash the value of the television rights their codes attract.

But speaking in the United States before his flight back to Australia on Saturday morning, Mr Turnbull said the plan would go ahead.

“Parents around Australia will be delighted when they know that during football matches, and cricket matches, live sporting events before 8:30pm, there will be no more gambling ads,” he said.

“There are no gambling ads allowed before 8:30pm generally, but there’s been an exception for a long time, of live sporting events.”

Mr Turnbull said the ban would not apply to racing.

Executives from the AFL and NRL had been lobbying Communications Minister Mitch Fifield to scrap the plans.

ABC News had also been told Cricket Australia was pushing against the change.

After 8:30pm, the status quo will remain.

“The gambling companies have actually been at the forefront of calling for just these types of restrictions,” Senator Fifield said.

“The Responsible Wagering Council have been urging the Government to look at this area because they recognise that there’s a need for change.”

Ban a ‘good, big first step’: Xenophon

The gambling policy could help secure Senate crossbench support for other media reforms dealing with ownership and reach restrictions.

Senator Nick Xenophon has long campaigned for restrictions to gambling advertising, and commands three votes in the Upper House.

He described the announcement as a “good, big first step”, but said he wanted further protections put in place to force regional broadcasters to produce local content as part of any broader media shakeup.

The Greens seemed unlikely to support the measures, while Labor maintained it needed to see the detail.

“We do want to see a diversity of voices available in the Australian media environment,” Deputy Opposition Leader Tanya Plibersek said.

“We need to see the details of what the Government is proposing, what we frequently see is that Malcolm Turnbull delivers less than people expect.”

The Coalition has also proposed changes to the “anti-siphoning list” which makes sure certain sports are broadcast on free-to-air networks, giving pay television a better chance of bidding for major events.

Government ‘scraps licence fees’ to fund lost ad revenue

The nation’s free-to-air television networks had also raised concerns it would eat into their advertising revenue, and demanded their Commonwealth licence fees be cut to fund the losses.

Networks pay about $130 million per year for their broadcast licences.

Under the new model, that would be replaced by what is called a “spectrum charge” of about $40 million.

“In the last budget I cut free-to-air licence fees by 25 per cent, my predecessors have also cut licence fees,” Senator Fifield said.

“So it’s been something that both sides of politics have recognised that the licence fees are something that are really from a bygone era.

“What we have done is taken the opportunity to not only provide a shot in the arm for free-to-air broadcasters, but we have taken this opportunity to provide a community dividend in the form of further gambling advertising restrictions.”

Free TV Australia said it was a “tremendous” package that had been agreed to by the industry.

“There’s nowhere else in the world that licence fees are charged like this, it was a complete anomaly,” chairman Harold Mitchell said.

Australia’s third largest network, Network Ten, had been hoping for a cut in its licence fees as it battles to survive in the tough television advertising market.

“The Government’s package provides very welcome, immediate financial relief for all commercial free-to-air television broadcasters,” Network Ten chief executive Paul Anderson said.

“It provides a boost for local content and the local production sector.

“Recent financial results and announcements from across the Australian media industry clearly demonstrate that this is a sector under extreme competitive pressure from the foreign-owned tech media giants.

“This package is not just about Ten or free-to-air television. It is about ensuring that there is a future for Australian media companies.”

By political reporter Matthew Doran, Updated 6 May 2017

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-17/why-all-gambling-ads-should-be-banned-during-sporting-matches/8363232

Kenny 23/4/17

  • $10 single bet for every game with nominated best chance of goalkicker for that game = $90
  • 1st goalkicker 3-leg multis  @ $10 x 3= $30 to cover all 9 games

Total cost = $120

  • Only need one goalkicker @12/1 to salute each week to get money back.
  • Land a 3-leg multibet and stand to win around $10k.

 

Consistent 1st goal kickers 2016-17

ADE – Walker

BRIS – Zorko

CAR – Weitering

COLL – Fasolo

ESS – Daniher

FREO – McCarthy, Walters

GC – T. Lynch

GEEL – Menzel, Hawkins

GWS – Stevie J, Cameron

HAW – Breust

MEL – Watts

NORTH – B. Brown

PORT – Dixon, Gray

RICH – Riewoldt

SAINTS – Bruce, Gresham

SYD – Franklin, Reid

WB – Stringer

WCE –Kennedy

With the 2017 AFL season nearly upon us, the sports betting agencies are gearing up for another onslaught of advertising across TV, Pay TV, radio, newspapers and the internet.  It really depresses me that our local game is now in bed with the betting agencies, so closely linked that the AFL relies on the money, while at the same time warning the AFL players of the dangers of gambling.  It was pleasing that some of the players have made comments about this irony recently, and with many AFL players now family men, they are also acutely aware of the responsibility they have to raise their own children in a gambling free environment – which is difficult to avoid when their kids are watching daddy on TV and there is a sports betting ad or odds update during every commercial break after a goal has been kicked.

GAMBLING advertising during AFL games is “out of control” according to Western Bulldogs premiership captain Easton Wood.

Wood took to Twitter during the telecast of Friday night’s AFLW game between the Bulldogs and Adelaide to raise his concerns and asked fans whether they agreed.

Wood’s tweet was retweeted more than 1000 times and had more than 2700 likes. Most of the replies were strong in their support, however some queried whether he would be prepared to play for less money if the gaming industry pulled its financial support for the game.

In a note attached to the tweet, he said the Bulldogs this week had their annual education session with the AFL, which he described as “both informative and well run.”

But he questioned why there was so much gambling advertising if gambling was such a big issue that it required an annual information session from the League.

“Why – as an industry – do we support the onslaught of gambling advertising you’re now faced with when watching an AFL game?” he wrote in the tweet.

“The obvious issue here is the effect this advertising has on children every time we pull on our boots. The big question is do we think the normalization of gambling – particularly to kids – is acceptable in this day and age?”

Friday night’s match was broadcast live on Fox Footy in Victoria, but the gambling industry advertises across all forms of live sport. The industry standard is that 10 per cent of advertising during live sport broadcasts can promote sports betting.

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Easton Wood

RESOLVING the issues surrounding gambling in the AFL won’t be easy but the conversation needs to happen, Geelong veteran Harry Taylor says.

Taylor said it was a concern to him that the eldest of his three children was able to name the gambling-related advertisements he saw when watching sport on TV.

However he said further education and discussion were critical if answers were to be found on the appropriate relationship between gambling and professional sport.

“When my eldest can name a lot of the ads on TV, that is a bit of a worry,” Taylor said.

“It’s certainly something that we need to keep talking about [and] educating people about. It’s not as simple as just cutting them out of the AFL.”

Western Bulldogs premiership skipper Easton Wood put the issue back on the agenda at the weekend when he questioned the level of gambling advertising during televised AFL games.

Wood wrote on social media: “Do we think the normalisation of gambling – particularly to kids – is acceptable in this day and age?”

Taylor said more education was needed for AFL players and society in general.